Hurricane Sandy restoration saves shorebirds, ‘living fossils’ they rely on

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

Roughly one million shorebirds pass through the Delaware Bay in the spring, when the largest population of horseshoe crabs in the world turns up to spawn. The largest concentration of red knots can be found in the bay at this time. This photo captures knots at Mispillion Harbor. Credit: Gregory Breese/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Roughly one million shorebirds pass through the Delaware Bay in the spring, when the largest population of horseshoe crabs in the world turns up to spawn. The largest concentration of red knots can be found in the bay at this time. This photo captures knots at Mispillion Harbor. Credit: Gregory Breese/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Today we’re sharing a post from GeoSpace by Kate Wheeling about the successful $1.65 million project to restore Sandy-affected beaches on Cape May’s inner shoreline, work that reinforced some of the most critically important stopover habitat for migrating shorebirds in Delaware Bay. The project was the first of 31 Sandy coastal resilience projects focused on rebuilding natural areas along the Atlantic Coast.

When Hurricane Sandy hit the U.S. East Coast two years ago, it threatened the survival of a 400-million-year-old crab species and about a million shorebirds that rely on the crabs’ eggs for nourishment…

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